OTHER  SERVICES

    I - 90 Green card renewal     

This application is used by lawful permanent residents status to apply for replacement or renewal of existing Permanent Resident Cards. Conditional residents may also use this application to apply for replacement of an existing Permanent Resident Card. Conditional residents may not use this application to replace, for any reason, an existing Conditional Resident Card that is expired or will expire within 90 days.

 

NOTE: Conditional permanent residents (for example, CR1, CR2, CF1, CF2) who obtained their status through marriage or entrepreneurship are issued a Permanent Resident Card for two years. When a conditional permanent resident’s status is within 90 days of expiration, the conditional permanent resident is ineligible for a replacement conditional resident card and must file a petition to remove the conditions, as follows:

 

  • If you became a conditional permanent resident through marriage to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, and your two-year conditional permanent resident status is expiring within the next 90 days, file Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence; or

  • If you became a conditional permanent resident based on the creation of a new commercial enterprise and a financial investment in the United States, and your conditional permanent resident status is expiring within the next 90 days, file Form I-829, Petition by Entrepreneur to Remove Conditions.

Upon receipt of your properly filed Forms I-751 or I-829, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) shall extend your conditional permanent resident status automatically, if necessary, until such time as USCIS has adjudicated the petition. The Form I-797 Receipt Notice for such a pending petition will serve as your proof of conditional permanent resident status.

 

    I - 131 Reentry visa    

This form is for applying to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for the following travel documents:

  • Reentry Permit

  • Refugee Travel Document

  • Advance Parole Document for Individuals Who Are Currently in the United States

NOTE: Generally, if you are in the United States and have applied for adjustment of status to that of a lawful permanent resident, your application will be deemed abandoned if you leave the United States without first obtaining an Advance Parole Document. Your application for adjustment of status generally will not be deemed abandoned, even if you do not apply for an Advance Parole Document before traveling abroad while an adjustment application is pending, if you currently are in one of the following nonimmigrant classifications, and remain eligible for and would be admissible in one of the following categories upon applying for admission at a port-of-entry:

a. An H-1 temporary worker, or H-4 spouse or child of an H-1;

b. An L-1 intracompany transferee, or L-2 spouse or child of an L-1;

c. A K-3 spouse, or K-4 child of a U.S. citizen; or

d. A V-1 spouse, or V-2/V-3 child of a lawful permanent resident. 

NOTE: Upon returning to the United States, most individuals must present a valid H, L, K, or V nonimmigrant visa and must continue to be otherwise admissible. If you do not have a valid or unexpired H, L, K, or V nonimmigrant visa, then you generally need to obtain an H, L, K, or V nonimmigrant visa at a U.S. Department of State (DOS) visa issuing post. Individuals will need a valid nonimmigrant visa, advance parole, or other travel document to present for reentry.

  • Advance Parole Document for Individuals Outside the United States

 

    N-400 Naturalization   

Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, is an application to become a naturalized U.S. citizen. If your biological or legal adoptive mother or father is a U.S. citizen by birth, or was naturalized before you reached your 18th birthday, you may already be a U.S. citizen.

You may apply for naturalization when you meet all the requirements to become a U.S. citizen. General eligibility requirements are the following.

  1. You are at least 18 years of age at the time of filing (except active duty members of the U.S. Armed Forces);

  2. You are a permanent resident of the United States for a required period of time;

  3. You have lived within the state or USCIS district where you claim residence for at least 3 months prior to filing;

  4. You have demonstrated physical presence within the United States for a required period of time;

  5. You have demonstrated continuous residence for a required period of time;

  6.  You demonstrate good moral character;

  7.  You demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. Constitution;

  8. You demonstrate a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government (also known as “civics”) as well as an ability to read, write, speak and understand basic English; and"

  9. You take an Oath of Allegiance to the United States.  Some applicants may be eligible for a modified oath."

 
 

    N-600 Certificates of citizenship   

You should file this application if:

  1. You are requesting a Certificate of Citizenship because you were born outside the United States to a U.S. citizen parent; or

  2. You are requesting a Certificate of Citizenship because you automatically became a citizen of the United States after birth, but before you turned 18 years of age. (A parent or legal guardian can also file Form N-600 on behalf of a minor child.)

Citizenship law has changed over the years and different laws apply to determine whether you automatically became a U.S. citizen at birth, or after birth but before you turned 18 years of age. If you are claiming U.S. citizenship based on your birth abroad to U.S. citizen parents, the law in effect on the date of your birth applies. For purposes of these provisions, you must be the biological child of your U.S. citizen parent, and different provisions apply depending on whether you were born in wedlock or out-of-wedlock.


If you are claiming U.S. citizenship after birth, but before you reached 18 years of age, the law in effect when the last qualifying condition was met is the law that applies to you. Generally, the conditions are listed below.


These conditions must be met before you turn 18 years of age:

  1. Your parent must be a U.S. citizen;

  2. You must be the biological child of that U.S. citizen parent;

  3. You must be lawfully admitted to the United States for lawful permanent residence; and

  4. You must be living in the United States in the legal and physical custody of your U.S. citizen parent.

 

You can file Form N-600 at any time if you became a U.S. citizen at birth or after birth, but before you turned 18 years of age. Filing this application is NOT a request to become a U.S. citizen. Filing this application is ONLY a request to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship which recognizes that you became a citizen on a particular date.

Adopted Child

An adopted child may also acquire U.S. citizenship through his or her adoptive U.S. citizen parent depending on the law being applied. Currently, an adopted child can acquire U.S. citizenship through his or her U.S. citizen parent. However, step children CANNOT acquire U.S. citizenship under this provision.

 

NOTE: If you are now 18 years of age, but all of the above conditions apply to you before your 18th birthday and you were under 18 years of age on February 27, 2001 (the date the law took affect), you may file this application to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship. However, if you were under 18 years of age on February 27, 2001, BUT not all of the conditions noted above were met prior to your 18th birthday, you must qualify for U.S. citizenship in your own right.

OTHER VISAS

There are other visa classifications available for legal status in the U.S.

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